CEDA Copland Lecture by Dr Robert Johnson

CEDA Copland Lecture by Dr Robert Johnson

NSW
Apr 11

CEDA is honoured to welcome Dr Robert Johnson, Executive Director of the Institute for New Economic Thinking to deliver the 2013 Douglas Copland Lecture with an address on navigating the global economy.

Limited places still available - register now.

 

Speakers

 

 Public event
 11/04/2013
 The Westin, Sydney, NSW

 Economy
 Lunch (12.00pm to 2.00pm)

    Contact us

    

 

Event overview

The paradox of risk aversion: Incoherent governance and the outlook for a dysfunctional world

CEDA is delighted to welcome Dr Robert Johnson, Executive Director of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, to present the 2013 Douglas Copland Lecture on the prevalent views on how to handle international fiscal problems, particularly risk averse austerity policies, and the challenges of governing and navigating through the choppy waters of the global economy.

Meet the speaker

Dr Robert Johnson
Executive Director, Institute for New Economic Thinking and
Senior Fellow and Director, Global Finance Project, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute New York

Dr Robert Johnson is an international investor and consultant to investment funds on issues of portfolio strategy. He recently served on the United Nations Commission of Experts on International Monetary Reform under the Chairmanship of Joseph Stiglitz. He currently sits on the Board of Directors of both the Economic Policy Institute and the Campaign for America's Future.

Previous key roles include:

  • Managing Director at Soros Fund Management where he managed a global currency, bond and equity portfolio specialising in emerging markets.
  • Managing Director of Bankers Trust Company managing a global currency fund.
  • Chief Economist of the US Senate Banking Committee.
  • Senior Economist of the US Senate Budget Committee.

About the Institute of New Economic Thinking

The mission of the Institute of New Economic Thinking (INET) is "to nurture a global community of next-generation economic leaders, to provoke new economic thinking, and to inspire the economics profession to engage the challenges of the 21st century."

The havoc wrought by our recent global financial crisis has vividly demonstrated the deficiencies in our outdated current economic theories, and shown the need for new economic thinking.

INET is supporting this fundamental shift in economic thinking through research funding, community building, and spreading the word about the need for change. It is a global community of thousands of new economic thinkers, ranging from Nobel Prize winning economists to teachers and students who have emerged from the shadows of prevailing economic thought, attracted by the promise of a free and open economic discourse.

INET was founded by three leading thinkers and philanthropists, including George Soros, and boasts governing and advisory boards including some of the world's economic luminaries.

About the Douglas Copland Lecture

In honour of its founder, Sir Douglas Copland, the annual lecture series commemorates CEDA's achievements as a body dedicated to informing, influencing and raising the standard of discussion on public policy. The lecture provides a platform for international experts to share and debate their ideas with an audience of business leaders, policy makers and leading academics.

Despite its reputation as the dismal science, the economics profession has flourished in Australia and Sir Douglas Copland was a leading figure in this development. He stands as one of Australia's most remarkable public figures of the past 100 years. He led the creation of the famous Premiers' Plan - the document, admired by John Maynard Keynes among others, that set Australia's economic management during the Great Depression and made Copland a household name.

Copland's ambition for Australia led him to found CEDA. He had previously shown his faith in an independent Australia in the 1930s, urging the Australian pound be separated from the British sterling. In the 1950s, he famously voiced the fear that Australia was "a milk bar economy" - an economy set on consumption at the expense of capital goods and productive inputs. CEDA began as his attempt to set out a different economic future.

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This page contains exclusive member only content. CEDA members can login to access this content. To enquire about the benefits of CEDA membership contact us.